Time for Convention Hell!

The annual Halloween bash that is Convention Hell is getting ready to go down at Asbury Park’s Convention Hall. For the past three years Dark City Entertainment has put on what has become, the party of the year. The entire arena is transformed into a gigantic concert hall of spookiness and select local bands grace the stage to cover some of their favorite artists. While song is the highlight of the night, this is the one event where I will bypass the music photos for some step and repeat portrait stylings. Of course with everyone being in costume and when the opportunity presents itself, I just have to play around with the shots.  A little diddy I made up of the hostess and her bill, no this is not the official flyer.

When you have 800 people attend an event, in some amazing costumes, can it get any better for a portrait guy? Me thinks not.  Two of my favorite from last years gala:

I have never been that slick in doing composites, it still takes me forever to cut something out, but the more you try the better you get, I think. One of those things that in person instruction would be a blessing. Online classes don’t cut it for me for this. This next one I think I have used somewhere before, but I really like their look so I popped them on a new background:

These guys are from two years ago and is one of the first composites I did from these shows when I started acquiring backgrounds.

Well, blood and ghoul is part of the mantra of the season…

Turn of the century NY set in London? Little help with this period style please…

Love this dude, The Purge….

That’s all for now. Thanks for stopping by, See you on the 28th!

Phil

Thoughts Going Crazy During Image Review

The review of an image can be a very trying undertaking at times with many signals traveling through the synapses at mach speed. Good, bad, indifferent, should I shouldn’t I. Well, if i shot it this way yes I could, but I did not so no, I can not. Will they like it, will the person it is of like it, OMG what if no one likes it. This is in the way. This looks distracting. The color is off here, that is not in focus,  eyes wrong, mouth wrong, mouth good bad eyes, expression is no good, good expression bad angle… I did like it at first but now I am not sure……

STOP.

A thousand thoughts in a matter of seconds. Actually, I have become incredibly adept at qualifying an image for release. But there are those that I remain on the fence with. I may like it, but I am still aware of the impact it will have upon the subject and will not release it if there is a question in regards to their approval. Usually happens when I know them. Yes, there are times when I feel strongly about an image and it goes out regardless. We are talking mainly about images shot during musical performances here, though all may apply to a static session just as easily.

The following image is one of those on the fence images that would not have seen the light of day if it was not for this blog entry. I think it is an awesome look from the main subject in the image, Renee, from the band Lowlight. It contains emotion, there is movement in her hair, there is a highlight on her hat, and you can see the strings vibrating from the E chord. Good shadows, good highlights.  Awesome image, she is feeling it. But, there are too many distractions for me. A guitar neck, a hand,  half a body and a bit of the keyboard destroys it for me. Poor framing on my part. Or just me having a bad case of OCD.

Lowlight21_PShepherd-4

Sometimes in these situation you can not avoid the extra items in the frame. That is why we press the button so many times. Always looking for the correct image. Not the perfect image, the correct image. So we remain conflicted.

And while there are fixes available, it is a no-no in my book for these events. Mine is a journalistic approach in this arena. What we see is what we get. We will let the studio sessions be the muse for the creative outlet kind of stuff. Do kinda like it though.

Lowlight21_PShepherd-4a

I did talk to Renee about the image and what I wanted to do. Always communicate. It makes things so much easier. I get the image frustrations off my chest and in this case, we even got it out in the world.

So if someone tells you it could take up to three weeks for your photos, it is ok. Let it. And remember they are probably going nuts trying to get them ready for you. Literally.  Of course when you have a deadline there will be no fussing about.

Thanks for stopping by! Till the next time…..

Phil